The First Inaugural Address

The First Inaugural Address

The first Inaugural Address ever in our country is of course George Washington’s first Address to congress after being elected and sworn in as President of the United States.

It became one of our great civic rituals that is part of the pomp and circumstance in the transfer of power from one President to the next.

Washington’s 1st inaugural is important (at least to me) because he was inherently honest. At the beginning of his address he admits to the anxiety that being elected President had caused him and how he misses his retirement.

In the 2nd paragraph of his speech he says “it would be peculiarly improper to omit in this first official Act, my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being” that he not only bless him but the new nation that had been established.

He continues throughout the speech to embrace the duty he feels to the American people and the new nation, to accept the responsibility of the office and to again ask God to guide and preserve the freedoms and liberties of the people.

George had a very good grasp on the enormity of the position he was in. He was honest about his fears, his anxiety and his gratitude. He was also wise enough to lay his anxiety at the feet of God to guide him on that 1st Presidential journey.

The first Inaugural set a precedent for other Presidents to follow. George was not worried about invoking the assistance of God or worried about offending anyone by his beliefs.

George Washington also set another precedent as he was sworn in by adding four words to the end of the oath, he said: “so help me God.” Every President after President Washington has uttered those same words.

Why then do so many Americans find the mention of God so offensive? Why in our modern times is Christianity under attack?

Neither George Washington nor any of the founding fathers stated or forced citizens to prescribe to their beliefs but simply invoked the blessings of their God upon this nation. As many have done after them and up to now we are still receiving those blessings.

Let us remember that our strength and our preserverance comes to us from a higher power: One Nation Under God.

It’s A Wonderful Life

It’s A Wonderful Life

This time of year has special meaning in our society…not just because of the season, celebrations and traditions but also from the joys we get from watching Christmas movies.

Today I am going to share my favorite Christmas movie with you and its meaning…and in my next post I am going to share my husband’s favorite.

Each of us has a favorite and I’m sure if you think about it you’ll find you have one too!

It’s a Wonderful Life has been my favorite movie for as long as I can remember.

Filmed in 1946 it is a story about a desperate man, George Bailey, who is ready to throw away his life on Christmas Eve because of a crisis in his life.

In the middle of his desperation, George wishes he was never born and God sends down an Angel–Clarence–to grant his wish.

Through the magic of film we see how the lives of many people were irrevocably changed when George Bailey does not exist to save them.

It is a story of a man who spent his life unselfishly helping others–and who in the end, in the most desperate moment of his life, finds that everyone comes to his rescue.

This heartwarming story demonstrates the strength of the human spirit and the frailty of human life.

The importance of family, hard work, strong values and a love of God and country.

It’s a Wonderful Life is my yearly reminder of how fortunate we are in this life, year after year, because of the people who came before us.

While it is not a traditional Santa Claus tale–it is the recounting of the importance of the season because of the promises Jesus gave us.

Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed brought the best of the season to life–the love of community, a commitment to serving others and the importance of a miracle at Christmas.

And it really reminds us that it is a wonderful life!

Time To Pray

Time To Pray

Do you ever find yourself wondering what is wrong with our world, with people, with traffic or with the simplest things that sometimes don’t seem very simple?

These are all good times to pray.

Prayers have helped me through some of the worst moments in my life. And prayers have given me a place to send my gratitude for the great moments in my life. Prayers have been there for all the moments in between.

When the world seems to be upside down, I pray, not for myself but for those in the turmoil.

When people seem to have lost their minds and are making bad decisions that affect others, I pray.

When people deliberately hurt others, through words or deeds, I pray.

It helps me to pray–for myself and for others. I ask for patience, I ask for wisdom and I ask for protection and I give thanks.

Too much these days it is not popular to admit that we believe in God and that we pray. People get offended if we say we will pray for them or that we will keep them in our prayers–but I pray for them anyway.

You see, I have been praying all my life. Some of my earliest memories are in church praying–and I always felt safe, at peace, and renewed.

But in an effort to be all inclusive and non divisive and politically correct, we have been getting away and turning our backs on God.

We have removed God from schools and from public buildings and universities. I hear they are even trying to remove God from our money–by erasing the words.

It’s a sad state of affairs–but a good time to pray.

A lady, who is an atheist, asked me recently, if I wouldn’t feel foolish when I die and realize there is no God.

My reply to her was this: “I won’t feel foolish–I won’t feel anything, I’ll be dead. But are you willing to live and take the chance that you might be wrong?”

She was not happy with my answer so of course, it was a good time to pray about it and I did.

Think about your life and see if things are not better for you and those around you–when you take time to pray.